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Phil woods hubs

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Hello everyone.

So I've been browsing the bikes and I have seen a lot of people with phil wood hubs. I wanted to know what everyone's thoughts on then would be?

Some people say they are amazing and others say they are too heavy for any real use. Which camp do you fall in?

Any thoughts or opinions are appreciated.
     
August 27, 2012 12:49 AM
Basilios
From: toronto
52 posts
1 bike
Weight shouldn't be an issue when riding in the street or commuting. Phil's are great. They last forever, spin smooth, and look nice. But if you are concerned about weight, you could go with Dura Ace which are in the same ball park in terms of quality, and are lighter.
     
August 27, 2012 01:02 AM
BRNDNLPZ
From: Los Angeles, CA
212 posts
1 bike
Dura Ace are really awesome hubs and fast. I wanted something I can have forever and spin like butter. Phil Wood fit in that realm and that's why I ordered the Low Flange Front hub in 20h. Go with what you think would work best. I'm also a big advocate of American made products.
     
August 27, 2012 01:23 AM
dwayneb9584
From: New York, NY
245 posts
7 bikes
A PW hf hubset is about 115 grams heavier then hf dura ace, thats like 0.253 of a pound. People exaggerate about the weight too much. That much weight will make NO difference on the street.
     
August 27, 2012 01:30 AM
adrian13346
From: Brooklyn,NY
89 posts
6 bikes
Paul. Lighter than Dura Ace and sealed.
     
August 27, 2012 02:34 AM
I have Phil Wood hubs (High Flange) and love them. They really are worth it if you can get them.
     
August 27, 2012 02:35 AM
richardg
From: San Mateo (SF Bay Area)
315 posts
3 bikes
I don't know what your budget is, but if you're going all out I love my Zipp hubs. They're over the top for most applications tho. But, gawd, they are no doubt the top of the line.
     
August 27, 2012 03:11 AM
MustangWolf
From: San Francisco, CA
360 posts
4 bikes
Thanks for the info all.

Now next stupid question. Am I only able to use the phil wood cogs on them?
     
August 30, 2012 12:47 AM
Basilios
From: toronto
52 posts
1 bike
I think you could use any cog except EAI and Surly but they recommend using Phil, it's the lockrings that are proprietary.
     
August 30, 2012 12:55 AM
adrian13346
From: Brooklyn,NY
89 posts
6 bikes
Weight should never even matter in a track bike anyways. As long as you're not going against nature and climbing hills/battling winds/rain, then it really doesn't matter what kind of weight you've got going on. Being concerned of your own weight always comes before being concerned of the weight of your bike.
Also, if you're going to be street riding, I don't recommend the DA hubs, because they're loose ball. We all know what happens to loose ball when abused. TBH I think hubs are overrated and people get Phil's to just have that "swag" on their bike.
You could get Formula's with sealed bearings and not be able to tell the difference between them and some Phil Woods. Once broken in, they all spin buttery. Plus, they save you tons of money since you don't have to deal with all of the crap that PH hubs give you in the fact that they're only compatible with certain cogs and you can only use their lock ring.
     
August 30, 2012 07:48 AM
brembilla
From: CA, Irvine (previously SJ)
429 posts
8 bikes
I am going to have to strongly disagree, I don't care how long you spin your formulas they will never spin or feel the way phil woods do even after a year of use. I do notice that they are a bit heavy even laced to real light hoops but I almost cannot stop my bike once it starts going.
     
September 19, 2013 06:36 AM
Jesse_May
From: Denver Colorado
4 posts
2 bikes
Then put new PW bearings in them..? They're like $10 retail for the set for both hubs.
     
September 19, 2013 08:07 AM
brembilla
From: CA, Irvine (previously SJ)
429 posts
8 bikes
Love phils. But I stick with dura ace. Easy to service and can be serviced whenever I want.
     
September 19, 2013 01:58 PM
mktng
From: Ottawa, ON Canada
816 posts
22 bikes
"I think you could use any cog except EAI and Surly but they recommend using Phil, it's the lockrings that are proprietary."

I remember reading that off of their website, but I have seen someone selling a rear wheel with a EAI cog on a Phil hub with the lock ring. I'm not too sure if I trust it or not, but we'll see.

Also, does have two different flange size hubs in a wheelset really effect riding and sturdiness? I figure that it won't be a big difference, since some road wheelsets have a larger rear hub and a small one in the front. Larger for the cassette.
     
January 24, 2014 06:41 PM
Rushing
From: Las Vegas, NV
372 posts
3 bikes
Flange size shouldn't affect the feel in any noticeable way, smaller flange will sacrifice a bit of lateral stiffness but it's trivial at best for normal riding.

Phil Wood hubs/cogs have a different thread pitch than most hubs/cogs, you can get most any cog to fit onto a Phill Wood hub but it shaves away at the threads on the shell, this can potentially strip the threads completely rendering the hub useless, but if they already put the EAI cog on it's too late to worry about that. Most of the time it will be okay, it just raises the risk of stripping. If you're in the same area as the seller ask to check them out and take a look at the threads to make sure they aren't stripped, or ask for a close photo of the threads if they're somewhere else. If you ever buy Phil Wood hubs new be sure to invest in the cog as well, there's no sense in dishing out a hundreds on a hubset and then cheaping out and using a cog that could damage the hub. Second hand, if you're getting a good deal it's probably worth it to buy, and you can always use this info to haggle and get a lower price too, on account of the potentially damaged threads.
     
January 24, 2014 09:02 PM
GromCake
From: Chicago, IL, United States
210 posts
11 bikes
And if you do get them just be sure to be extra careful when installing different cogs.
     
January 24, 2014 09:03 PM
GromCake
From: Chicago, IL, United States
210 posts
11 bikes
Phil Wood cogs do not have a different pitch than other English-threaded cogs. Their lockrings, however, are Italian-threaded.

The reason Phil Wood recommends not using EAI or Surly cogs has absolutely nothing to do with the thread pitch but rather because those cogs are thicker than most other cogs, resulting in less lockring threads engaged and (supposedly) increasing the chance of stripped cog threads.

FWIW, I've used EAI cogs on my Phil hub without any trouble whatsoever.

Also FWIW, Phil Wood cogs suck.
     
January 24, 2014 10:59 PM
Scrodzilla
From: South of Heaven
1005 posts
2 bikes
Why do PW cogs suck? Just overpriced or are they literally inferior in some way?
     
January 24, 2014 11:29 PM
cap
From: Portland, OR
67 posts
1 bike
In my experience with them, the teeth are too long and actually snag the chain links as they roll off the cog. As a result, they are loud and cause premature chain wear.

For the price, those issues shouldn't be present.
     
January 24, 2014 11:49 PM
Scrodzilla
From: South of Heaven
1005 posts
2 bikes
Hmm, I've read in a few places that the thread pitch is different. And when I tried to screw my Soma cog on it binded up so I figured it was true. But it's interesting to hear otherwise from a trusted source. Don't know why my Soma wouldn't screw on, but I'd believe it, most of it could be marketing schemes on Phil Wood's behalf trying to push more of their product.
     
January 25, 2014 06:40 AM
GromCake
From: Chicago, IL, United States
210 posts
11 bikes
Yep, website says 24 tpi so it's safe to assume it's your standard pitch. Don't believe everything you read on bike forums sometimes misinformed diguses like me will say some silly shit. hahaha
     
January 25, 2014 06:48 AM
GromCake
From: Chicago, IL, United States
210 posts
11 bikes
I read about it thoroughly before thinking to buying Phil hubs and what not. I just wanted to know if anyone else had other opinions about it. For a while I thought about trying to build a bike that is mostly American made stuff, but in this case I might not go for Phil hubs.

I read that it was mostly the thickness, but didn't know s much about the threading of the cog. I would think since they are an American company that try to follow up on more modern criteria when it comes to making something (ex: 1 1/8 headsets, English B.B., etc.), that they would follow through on that. Unless there's good reasoning behind using Italian threading on hubs. But I have no clue or care that much anymore.
     
January 27, 2014 04:42 PM
Rushing
From: Las Vegas, NV
372 posts
3 bikes
Don't overlook PAUL COMPONENTS. made in U.S.A and alot prettier imo. same grade of hub..if not.. better.
     
January 27, 2014 09:42 PM
mktng
From: Ottawa, ON Canada
816 posts
22 bikes
They're definitely standard thread pitch, the source I read that from was very likely misinformed. And yeah, Paul's are a good choice for American made if you ever follow through on that build, better looking than Phil's imo.
     
January 27, 2014 11:52 PM
GromCake
From: Chicago, IL, United States
210 posts
11 bikes
I really like Paul hubs too. Often overlooked despite being extremely good quality.

The only negative is that they're not available fixed/fixed.
     
January 28, 2014 04:12 AM
Scrodzilla
From: South of Heaven
1005 posts
2 bikes

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